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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  April 26, 2017 2:07am-3:59am EDT

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would pay for the wall. >> major garrett at the white house. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back.
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president trump fired the first round in what may become a trade war with america's second-biggest trading partner. the commerce department proposed a 20% tax on canadian lumber. it's one of canada's biggest exports, and it goes into a lot of american homes. the trump administration says that government subsidies make canadian lumber artificially cheap. a trade war could be costly, because the u.s. sells as much to canada as it buys. just ask american dairy farmers. dean reynolds did. >> reporter: gina hinchly's wisconsin farm has 130,000 cows, producing 1,000 gallons of milk every day. hers is one of the 9,000 dairy
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billion to wisconsin's economy. and this spring, there's been a gusher of american milk. >> we've had more milk from the same amount of cows than ever before. >> reporter: but that's a problem. and according to the president, our neighbors to the north are making it worse. >> canada, what they've done to our dairy farm workers is a disgrace. it's a disgrace. >> reporter: canada's decision to lower prices on certain kinds of dairy products has undermined american dairy and boosted canadian farmers whose product is now cheaper. for years, american farmers exported their dairy products to canada tax-free and were counting on exporting their record-high commodity to their usual canadian customers, but now they're stuck. >> i think we're afraid. we have a surplus of milk, so a lot of us farmers are worried. what is the future for us? >> reporter: grassland, a big dairy processor here has lost
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last year and 75 family farms have shuttered or are in trouble. wisconsin farms like john list's. he's called dozens of other processors for help. >> it was just no, too much milk, too much milk, too much milk. >> reporter: this morning, the president tweeted we will not stand for this. the dairy farmers are hoping he's just not crying over spilled milk. first daughter ivanka trump went to germany for a meeting of business women and government. >> reporter: ivanka trump had come to a high-powered conference in berlin to champion the cause of working women. but she came with baggage, her father's baggage. >> he's been a tremendous champion of supporting families. >> reporter: at that, some
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from the microphone began to groan. >> i need to address one more point. >> reporter: mind the audience's skepticism, the moderator asked, stem toward the attitude donald trump had to women in the past, seeming to go to the video about groping women. >> i certainly heard the criticism from the media. and that's been perpetuated, but i know from personal experience. >> reporter: president trump had also championed women's rights, his daughter said. german chancellor angela merkle had welcomed ivanka trump here. at least, says joseph braumle, that was the plan. >> i think that was a smart move by our chancellor. she made it clear, we want to have contact and maybe if
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radical man, so be it. >> reporter: ivanka trump later downplayed the incident, saying politics is politics. but scott, the first daughter's first foray onto the international stage had its rough moments. >> mark phillips at the brand brandenburg gate. president trump is strengthening the area around the korean peninsula. we spoke with mark hill. hill is the dean of the university of denver's joseph corvill school. in terms of american lives is north korea a threat or an irritant? >> it's a threat. it's a threat. first of all, we have some 28,000, 38,000 americans in south korea, but we have to
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understand, this is an agreement we have. we are duty-bound, treaty-bound to come to south korea's defense. should the north koreans attack. if we have to go in there, we would be in the middle of the fight. so you bet. it's a threat to our lives. >> you led the american envoy negotiating. what do you know about his father? >> his father seemed to care what we thought. and what distinguishes his son, he doesn't seem to care what any of us think, and he's certainly not been interested in any, any phase of negotiation. >> is he sane? >> sane from the point of view of running that country, of making sure that he's consolidated power, making sure that everyone works for him, yeah, yeah. >> we know that the north koreans have been successful in building missiles and successful in detonating nuclear
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tests. the real trick is putting those two things together. what are the chances that the north koreans are close? >> you know, very hard to say. but the feeling is that within the next four years , they coul have a missile system with a nuclear warhead that would be credible. whether it would finally work when they pushed the button, hard to say, but it would be credible. and any president would have to consider that as a real threat. >> former ambassador chris hill. coming up, keep your eyes on the road and hands on the wheel. now, there's an app for that. later, as the water grows, drivers bailed.
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smartphones, cars and teenagers, a dangerous combination. but now there's a smartphone app that could save lives. here's kris van cleave. >> would you say you're a good driver? >> as g
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could be, i guess. >> reporter: sarah gregory's been driving for about a year. her parents asked her to download an app that tracks and scores her performance every time she's behind the wheel. it's almost like having mom or dad in the car to remind you. >> knowing it's in the background, it helps me drive a lot better. if i'm speeding, i'll look down, and i'll be like, my app will take off for that. >> reporter: sarah's parents cliff and julie also use the ever drive app. >> we can tell when they use their phone or didn't use their phone. we can detell if they were exceeding the speed limit. >> reporter: can these devices make me as an adult a better driver. >> they have the poe tones tento that. >> reporter: she runs the national safety council. >> what we have to do is get to a point
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comfortable getting that feedback and modifying their driving behavior. >> reporter: the technology is a growing business from apps to devices like verizon hum. >> if she drives like this, you can tell her to drive more like this. >> reporter: buick has now maid smart driver technology standard in most vehicles. >> we have 1 million customers enrolled in smart driver today. >> reporter: the smart drover system not only helps driving but can save you money. >> you can opt in to seek an opportunity to get an insurance discount. and we're seeing that the customers are receiving a 30% discount on their insurance. >> reporter: the apps essentially try to make safe driving into a game and you get a score and are compared to other drivers. buick believes they can increase safety using this technology coupled with things like collision avoidance and lane departure avoidance. next, nascar's most
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under water. one driver had to abandon ship when her car was submerged. a cemetery flooded and at least one casket floated to the surface. dale earnhardt jr. says he will retire in november. the son of a legend, earnhardt won the most popular driver award 14 times and has 26 cup victories. now 42 and he recently married, he's faced many concussions. up next, a lost version of cbs news. discover the storyy onl your dna can tell.
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if itu's usually because you were driving too fast or you didn't look before you turned or you didn't stop for someone in the crosswalk. always be alert. pedestrians don't come with airbags.
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finally tonight, we turn back the clock, 50 years to april 1967, and one of the more unusual chapters in television history. >> the cbs evening news, with arnold zinker, substituting for walter cronkite during the strike. >> yes, walter cronkite was on strike. the union representing tv personalities was on a walkout. john daley and others were off the air and on the street. newscasters were replaced by management. but who would subf for cronkite? an a to z search led to arnold
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zinker, a 28-year-old cbs executive who had worked his way through school doing radio broadcasts. >> i said i've never done television. they said you're going to do the cbs morning news, then they said stay around and do the midday news. >> and with about an hour of experience under his belt, he was called in to fill in for cronkite. >> planes have been using a massive bomb. >> he got more than 3,000 fan letters. >> it's the standard case of the understudy. the star goes out for whatever reason, and an understudy nobody's ever heard of sits in, sits in the chair, gets good reviews. >> anchor was born. >> i do think they almost felt, he hit the lottery, maybe i could hit the lottery some day. >> on the 13th day, the strike was settled. after weeks at the pinnacle of network
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had a great future ahead of him. >> that's when i decided to go to boston and do the news. >> bitten by the anchor bug, he tried his hand at local tv, and years later he returned to cbs briefly in a "60 minutes" cameo, in his new career, training executives to master the public spotlight. >> he travels the country, preaching the gospel according to zism nker. >> now a half century after zinker made headlines, he is a footnote. >> tv trivia for 100. >> arnold zenker replaced this newsman. >> this has been the cbs evening news with arnold zenker substituting for walter cronkite. that's the orn
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for this wednesday. for some of you the news continues, for others, check back later for cbs morning news and cbs this morning. from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm scott pelley. this is the "cbs overnight news." i'm don dahler. president trump has summoned all members of the senate today. tensions are rising in asia. the north is expected to conduct another nuclear test. an armada is south of the korean peninsula. and trump is being asked to show restraint. adriana diaz has the story from beijing. >> reporter: president trump is also ramping up his war of words. monday he said kim jong un is not a strong militarily as he
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international community for not doing more to rein him in. >> the status quo in north korea's also unacceptable. >> reporter: at the white house on monday, president trump scolded members of the u.n. security council for falling short in their dealings with north korea. >> the council must be prepared to impose additional and stronger sanctions. >> reporter: in a show of force, intended to send a warning to north korea, the uss carl vinson strike group along with two japanese destroyers are rapidly approaching the korean peninsula. there they'll be joined by south korean ships. the uss michigan, a nuclear-powered submarine also arrived in the port city of pusan today. angered by the buildup and threat of further sanctions, the regime has stepped up its rhetoric, unveiling new weapons while lashing out at its adversaries. north korean media called the movement extremely dangerous, saying
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carefully any catastrophic consequence. >> this raises the stakes. >> reporter: analyst jonathan polak says the white house needs to proceed cautiously. >> with the united states and others talking far too loose lay of the prospects of a preemptive strike, that's what would trigger retaliatory actions by north korea. >> reporter: it's also been three days since tony kim was detained at north korea's airport. >> we could stumble needlessly into what would be the biggest crisis in east asia since the united states intervened in the korean war in 1950. >> reporter: to avoid that, president trump is working closely with china. he's already spoken with china's president twice in the past two weeks. first daughter and white house adviser, ivanka trump continues her visit to germany. she's taking part in an international woman's summit. but it wasn't all smilend
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handshakes. ivanka actually got booed by the audience when she described her father as quote a tremendous champion of supporting families. mark phillips is in berlin. >> reporter: this is no ordinary visit by an ordinary white house official. this is three visits in one by ivanka trump the first daughter, the presidential adviser and the businesswoman. it's complicated, like the state of u.s./german relations right now. on the face of it, ivanka trump has come to berlin for a high-powered conference on promoting the role of working women. it's one of her pet issues. but she's also here because angela merkel knows an opportunity when she sees one. when the german chancellor went to washington to meet ivanka's father, the atmosphere bordered on icy. so when angela merkel met ivank
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women conference it was more than playing to the first daughter's interests. political analysts say it was a way to use a side door to get into the white house. >> you take what you get. >> reporter: and what do you think you get with her? >> you get access to donald trump and maybe a moderating effect to donald trump, because he's also surrounded by people who are less moderate and seem to be more radical. >> reporter: ivanka, the special adviser to the president, did tell gayle king that when it comes to trying to influence her father on issues that she cares about, she's not shy. >> this particular title was about giving critics the comfort that i'm holding myself to the highest ethical standard. but i'll weigh in with my father on, on the issues i feel strongly about. >> reporter: but this visit isn't about issues. it's about trying to jump start a stalled relationship. we actually d
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ivanka trump's position is on the issues of contention between washington and berlin right now. russia, nato refugees. we do know that the trump administration has yet to appoint its own ambassador to germany, so that right now go terms of high-level diplomacy, ivanka trump is it. a lot of your favorite tv shows could be in reruns this fall. the writers guild has voted to authorize a strike, and that could be bad news for hollywood. >> shows like the roseanne barr show, the gilligan's island show were shot right here in this studio. sound stages like this have never been busier. 455 of them were built just this season compared to, that's more tan about six years ago, more than double than about six years ago that is. right now, wrietders are saying we're seeing more content coming from hulu and netflix and they want hollywood to pay for the new
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late night talk shows. >> injected pieces of golf balls, let them play through. >> reporter: but all those jokes come from union writers who could soon be putting their pens down and putting the shows in jeopardy. more than 6300 of this members voted by a margin of 96% to authorize a march on the picket lines if a deal isn't reached with the producers union before the current contract expires on may 1st. the fall lineup could also take a hate. >> i skipped kindergarten. >> reporter: tv writer betty carr has worked on shows like "private practice." the writers are paid per episode. a traditional broadcast series runs22-24 episodes, but now shows on cable or
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average of just 12 episodes. the shows are often shot to look more like a movie, taking longer in production, which keeps writers tied up for the same amount of time while making less money. >> the average income for writers has gone down, 23%. it's about not being able to sustain yourself. >> reporter: wrietders are asking for higher script fees. bigger residuals from streaming media and larger contributions to their health plans. when unionized writers went on strike ten years ago, it lasted more than three months, halting production on tozs of tv shows and films. it also cost the industry at least $2 billion. in a statement released monday night, the producers alliance said they remain committed to reaching a deal but warned the 2007 writers strike hurt everyone. writers lost more than it $287 million in compensation that was never recovered. >> hopefullyt
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at. it will be hard, it will be scary if that's what we have to do. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back. 1 i n 10 houses could get hit by rything. you an expensive septic disaster. but for only $7 a month, rid-x helps break down waste. avoid a septic disaster with rid-x. ltry align probiotic.n your digestive system? for a non-stop, sweet treat goodness, hold on to your tiara kind of day. get 24/7 digestive support, with align. the #1 doctor recommended probiotic brand. also in kids chewables. clearasil rapid action begins working fast for clearly visible results in as little as 12 hours. wow! but what other teen problems can it fix fast? will clearasil act fast to help this teen concentrate on his math test? darn! it only worked on the acne. can it hel... nope. no. so let's be clear: clearasil works fast on teen acne, not so much on other teen things. and now there's new clearasil overnight spot patches with
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there's a place off the eastern shore of canada they call iceberg alley. each year, hundreds of large bergs float by, melting as they drift their way south. but this year, there's a bumper crop. and it's attracting a lot of tourists, scientists and jeff glor. >> reporter: we're off the eastern-most part of north america. the canadian coast guard alone has been called 85 times this season to help ships in trouble. but this is a team effort. and the goal is to make sure those emergencies never happen in the first place, which is why we went up with the international ice patrol to look for dangers below. the c-130j in hangar at the st. john's airport comes outnl
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in newfoundland and labrador, that is not often. as we boarded, we saw how everyonee every moment matters for the international ice patrol. >> all of this is to get a general overview. >> reporter: gabriele mcgraw is the u.s. coast guard commander leading the patrol. a coalition of 17 nations first formed in 1913 after the titanic's maiden voyage was doomed by an iceberg. >> any vessel hiding oeeding ou warnings has been safe. >> reporter: this is about identifying and tracking the biggest and most dangerous formations. >> what it will do is track the sea temperature and the currents at the depth of 50 meters, which we consider to be the driving depth of the iceberg. >> reporter: signals from a buoy can be tracked immediately from the patrol's operating center in
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connecticut. 660 icebergs right now. you typically see how many this time of year? >> on average, at the end of april, our number's about 212. >> reporter: so around three times as mm rigany right now. >> exactly. >> reporter: this year's were brought in part by two extraordinary weather systems in march. >> a low pressure system that moved south of the island of newfoundland and it pulled those icebergs down south through the labrador current. we went from 37 to 455 in the shipping lanes. >> reporter: it produced spectacular images. there it is from up high. but also loosened all this sea ice which has clogged the world's busiest shipping .
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standards for maersk. >> we really try to avoid the areas of icebergs. it is definitely something that needs to be considered in safe navigation. >>eporter: the waves of ice are crippling the fishing business and stranding large ferries. the patrol planes can fly just hundreds of feet above the ocean's surface to give spotters a clear view. there's also a 360 degree radar under the nose. what does the radar show? ? it will actually automatically pick up targets. >> reporter: the sights can be sublime. they draw tourists from around the world to this unique island province. but as commander mcgraw knows, the danger is ever print. the worst-case scenario you're trying to prevent is another titanic. >> exactly. that's something that we keep in our minds every day is the disaster that happened in
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and we strife to produce the best nchx possible. >> reporter: they found 382 icebergs. and keep in mind. peak season is not until may and june. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back. ♪ ♪
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professional careers searching for that perfect sound. then there are people who search the world for the perfect sound of silence. lee cowan found one of those. >> the trail is narrowing and will continue to narrow as we go up. >> reporter: it may sound a little odd, but gordon hempton truly feeds his soul through the music of his ears. to him, nothing is more nourishing than pure, unpolluted, natural quiet. >> coming out here in the quiet's almost taking a vitamin for you. >> vitamin q. you can't buy it, but you can have it.
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definitely an endangered species. >> reporter: we first met gordon 27 years ago. >> we've also compromised on our ability to sense peace. >> reporter: when sunday morning followed him around as he went about recording silence. >> you get down low, and you can here the wo, wo, wo, wo. >> reporter: he calls himself the sound tracker. he's been all over the world, listening to nature's soundscapes. and after all those years. >> all right, here it is, lee, the boardwalk. >> reporter: claims to have found one of the quietest spots in the lower 48 states. it's in the middle of the hoh rainforest in washington's olympic park. getting there is an adventure in being wet. the average rainfall here is anywhere between 12
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yes, feet. but a soggy remoteness is actually the point. gordon considers its silence so sacred, he won't allow anyone to utder a word. >> so we get a little further, i'm going to look at you. i'm going to give you the look, and that means no whispering even. >> reporter: okay. >> we're just going to go listen to the silence. >> reporter: he calls it one square inch of silence. a project he started on earth day, 12 years ago. it's his auditory line in the sand. a place he's trying to protect from all outside noise. you might think that'd be a pretty easy task way out here in the middle of nowhere. but -- >> there is no middle of nowhere if you take into account the sky. >> reporter: as we talked, just outside his one square inch of silence, we heard no fewer than five jets in less
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>> listen what happens as that jet passes. and grows louder and louder to the distant sound of the hoh which defines this valley against the mountain side. >> reporter: you just don't hear it anymore. >> it disappears. >> reporter: even the raindrops i can't hear anymore. >> yeah, you can't hear the raindrops. >> reporter: to gordon, it's only getting worse. >> i think it would be very difficult in the continental united states to find a place where you could go a day without hearing a noise or even an hour without hearing noise. >> reporter: the national park services natural sounds and night skies division. yes, there really is such a thing. over the last decade, its scientists have placed hundred dollars -- hundreds of microphones all over the country. surveys show over 90% of the people who come to commune with nature come just as much for their ears asir
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>> it's critical for people, for the quality of our experience, for the quality of our health to provide these quiet places in the landscape where we can take refuge from the trials and stresses of every day life and immerse ourselves in the natural world that's a little bit kinder and gentler to us. >> reporter: just the noise we humans make, he says, is making it harder to find those places. and it's having real consequences for wildlife as well. >> you know, if you're the mouse trying to avoid being eaten, if your hearing is masked by noise, that means the predator can get that much closer to you before you're aware of it. >> reporter: you might be is discu surprised how far noise can travel. at glacier national park they were getting complaints that they could hear motorcycles, even though there were
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for miles. >> this is lake mcdonald. >> reporter: so he was dispatched to see if that was possible. and according to acoustic modeling, it was. >> as it comes out of this pass down towards the lake. the noise will spread all the way across the lake and it might be 15 miles, maybe farther. >> reporter: again, that's one motorcycle. >> even if you don't perceive it as noise, they're still preventing you from hearing all the other sounds that we would like to preserve for you. >> so we try to record red-legged frogs. >> reporter: bernie krauss is trying to preserve nature sounds, too. in fact, he's got some 5,000 hours of recordings, all meticulously documented in his studio near napa valley. >> here's the specific chorus of frogs. >> that is really loud. >> reporter: couldn't hear
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rs volume is that in many of the places he set up his microphones, the voice of the natural world has changed. >> i've taken a look at my archive recently. and i think that over50% of what i've recorded no longer exists either it's all together silent or it no longer exists in any of its original form. >> reporter: he points to this recording he made in a costa rican rainforest back in 1989. he went back to that same spot at any years later after much of the nearby area had been logged. and this time, it sounded like this. >> it's dramatic. >> reporter: this great animal orchestra, as he calls it, has a lot to say. the early morning chorus of song birds at californi
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ridge state park is one of his favorites. >> what these critters are doing is telling us how they're feeling about this particular time and place. and it's a narrative. it's a story. >> reporter: a story bernie says is being composed by nature every day. we just need stop and listen. it used to the environmental protection agency did that. but in the '80s, the office of noise abatement is closed, and with it most of the federal government's ears, save the national park service, which leaves the listening largely to folks like bernie, and of course gordon. when we left him at his one square inch of silence, he was dill gently taking notes and every once in a while smiling at the tiniest of sounds and wincing at the ones he wishes weren't there at all. >> we save what we love at any cost.
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with planet earth,
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some kids won't let anything stand in their way. steve hartman met one on the road to the basketball court. >> reporter: every week he set himself up for disappointment. every week, 13 year old jamarian styles came to this community center in boca raton, florida. and every week he was disappointed. >> every day, they would start picking teams, and i would be left out. you can break someone's heart like that. >> reporter: the problem was obvious to everyone but jamarion. he lost his hands and most of his arms due to a rare bacterial infection when he was an infant.
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have you heard of that sport? >> every day. >> reporter: why don't you play soccer? >> you would think i would be good at soccer, i'm really not. i'm horrible. >> reporter: which is why on the first day of class here at eagle's landing school he took his task to the coach, said he wanted to be on the team this year. >> i said great, make sure you try out. >> reporter: what were you thinking? >> this man has no arms, how is he going to play basketball. he told me i've never been on a team before. even if i don't play, i just want to be on the team. how could i say no to that. >> reporter: that's how the eagles got their first armless basketball player. jamarion quickly earned a reputation as the hardest worker on the squad. >> he was usually the first one in the gym, the last one to leave. >> reporter: still, he sat on the bench most of the season until last month. coach put him in the game with about six minutes left. and when he eventually got the
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court, everyone yelled "shoot it", so he did. and sank a three pointer. and if you didn't quite see it, don't worry, shortly after that, he got the ball again, this time on the near side for another three-pointer. at the buzzer. jamarion style. the kid no one would pick was now everyone's hero. needless to say, today jamarian can play all he wants at the community center. he just maid the volleyball team and has every intention of playing football next year. really, the only thing he won't play is the victim. if i could wave a magic wand right now and give you your arms back right now, would you want them? >> i don't need them. >> reporter: you don't need them? >> no. >> reporter: who needs hands when you have this kind of touch. steve hartman on the road
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bo boca raton, florida. did michael flynn commit a felony? >> as a former military officer, you simply cannot take money from russia. >> but members of congress say he did without permission. also stock prices soar and the housing market is red hot. tracking teen drivers. the app that turns father and mother into big brother. >> you can tell if they're exceeding the speed limit, if they are stopping or accelerating like crazy. and our own lost episode. >> this is the cbs evening news. w youthere e accidental anchor man. >> i certainly was. this is the "cbs overnight news."
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his failure to disclose contacts with russia cost michael flynn his job as national security adviser. now two key members of congress suggest it could cost him a lot more than that. the leaders of the house oversight committee say that the retired general did not get permission for a paid trip to russia, and they say failure to disclose that payment is a possible felony. punishable by up to five years in prison. here's jeff pegues. >> reporter: when retired lieutenant general michael flynn travelled to moscow in 2015, he was photographed sitting right next to vladimir putin and was paid almost $34,000 to speak. today house oversight committee
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chairman jason chaffetz says he may have broken the law. the top democrat on the committee, elijah committee shows documents showed flynn did not properly disclose the russian payments. >> he was supposed to get permission, and he was supposed to report it, and he didn't. >> reporter: according to the law, flynn should have sought approval from the secretary of state and the secretary of the army to make the moscow trip. he was head of the intelligence agency during the obama administration. and in a statement, his lawyer said his client briefed the intelligence agency, a component of the department of defense both before and after the trip. flynn is one of several trump campaign representatives under scrutiny by the fbi, which is investigating whether they coordinated with the russians during the 2016 election. he was fired as president trump's national security adviser just 24 days into the job after misleading the vice president about his contacts withhe
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ambassador, sergei kislyak. >> the white house has refused to provide this committee with a single piece of paper. >> reporter: today congressman cummings says the white house was stonewalling the investigation. white house press secretary sean spicer. >> right now to ask the white house to produce documents that were not in the possession of the white house is ridiculous. >> reporter: congressional democrats believe sally yates could shed some light on the issue. today it was announced that she will testify on the hill early next month. >> jeff pegues in the washington newsroom. a cbs news poll today finds that 60% of americans feel the economy is in good shape. stock prices today came close to record highs. jim axelrod has the story behind the numbers. >> in the 24 weeks since election day, the stock market has had quite a
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straight up. the nasdaq is up nearly 15%, the dow jones up 13%. and the s&p nearly 10%. corporate earnings are better than expected. but a lot of this rally has been based on what's expected to happen. take the corporate tax cut plan president trump will reveal tomorrow, proposing to reduce the rate from 35% down to 15%. throw in the growing likelihood we'll avoid a government shutdown here, and french election results that have stopped the ground shaking there at least for now. and it's full steam ahead. all of it gives the president as a bold-faced talking point as the 100 day mark approaches. the housing market is also sizzling and john blackstone has that. prospective buyers, they are finding houses for sale. >> wow! man, i think inventory is just so low right now. we just don't have very many things to go look at that are suited. >> reporter: across the country, there is a rush to buy.
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the market an average 84 days. this year it's just 45 days. real estate agent cindy wilson. >> we still have more buyers, currently than we have homes for sale. supply and demand, you have a strong seller's market. >> reporter: in port richmond, california, prices have almost recovered from their steep fall in 2008. nationally, prices in february were up 5.8%, the sharpest rise in more than 2.5 years. sharp spikes have been seen in cities across the country. in minneapolis, the median home price is $223,938. up 17% since the housing bust in 2008. in dallas, the prices rose 48%, to $230,000. and in denver, they're up to
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$330,000. >> there's almost a boom going on. >> reporter: but ken rozen believes this boom won't lead to a bubble. >> it's a red hot housing market. remember, it's bouncing off of the 30-year low of home ownership rates that we had in 2016. so a lot of people have delayed buying. >> reporter: mortgages are also harder to get and require larger down payments than during the earlier boom. and the uptick in interest rates is providing a push to get into the housing market now. >> john blackstone in san francisco, thanks very much. before day 100 comes day 99. congress must pass a spending bill by friday to keep the government running. major garrett is at the white house for us tonight. one of the things holding up the spending bill was the president's insistence on funding for the southern border wall, but now he's given in. >> reporter: that's right. in the end, it was a choice between fighting for the wall and a government shutdown, and the white house blinked.
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securing instead more generalized funding for border security. late this afternoon, president trump told reporters, the wall will be a reality. >> we're already preparing. we're doing plans, we're doing specifications. we're doing a lot of work on the wall, and the wall gets built. >> in your first term? >> the wall is very, very important. >> in your first term? >> well, it's certainly, yeah, yeah, yeah. >> reporter: notice what's missing, the conspicuous campaign promise that mexico would pay for the wall. >> major garrett at the white house. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back.
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first round in what may become a trade war with america's second-biggest trading partner. the commerce department proposed a 20% tax on canadian lumber. it's one of canada's biggest exports, and it goes into a lot o of american homes. the trump administration says that government subsidies make canadian lumber artificially cheap. a trade war could be costly, because the u.s. sells as much to canada as it buys. just ask american dairy farmers. dean reynolds did. >> reporter: gina hinchly's wisconsin farm has 130,000 cows, producing 1,000 gallons of milk every day. hers is one of the 9,000 dairy farms that contribute some $43 billion to wisconsin's economy.
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gusher of american milk. >> we've had more milk from the same amount of cows than ever before. >> reporter: but that's a problem. and according to the president, our neighbors to the north are making it worse. >> canada, what they've done to our dairy farm workers is a disgrace. it's a disgrace. >> reporter: canada's decision to lower prices on certain kinds of dairy products has undermined american dairy and boosted canadian farmers whose product is now cheaper. for years, american farmers exported their dairy products to canada tax-free and were counting on exporting their record-high commodity to their usual canadian customers, but now they're stuck. >> i think we're afraid. we have a surplus of milk, so a lot of us farmers are worried. what is the future for us? >> reporter: grassland, a big dairy processor here has lost more than $150 million in the last year and 75 family farm
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have shuttered or are in trouble. wisconsin farms like john list's. he's called dozens of other processors for help. >> it was just no, too much milk, to much milk, too much milk. >> reporter: this morning, the president tweeted we will not stand for this. watch. whatever he intends to do, scott the dairy farmers are hoping he's just not crying over spilled milk. first daughter ivanka trump went to germany for a meeting of business women and government. but it didn't go as well as planned. mark phillips was there. >> reporter: ivanka trump had come to a high-powered conference in berlin to champion the cause of working women. but she came with baggage, her father's baggage. >> he's been a tremendous champion of supporting families. >> reporter: at that, some members of the audience away from the microphone began to groan. >> i
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point. >> reporter: might the audience's skepticism, the moderator asked, stem toward the attitude donald trump had to women in the past, seeming to go to the video about groping women. >> i certainly heard the criticism from the media. and that's been perpetuated, but i know from personal experience. >> reporter: president trump had always championed women's rights, his daughter said. german chancellor angela merkle had welcomed ivanka trump here. a way, they hoped to warm relations after the meeting in washington. at least, says joseph brommel, that was the plan. >> i think that was a smart move by our chancellor. she made it clear, we want to have contact and maybe if it
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radical man, so be it. >> reporter: ivanka trump later downplayed the incident, saying politics is politics. but scott, the first daughter's first foray onto the international stage had its rough moments. >> mark phillips at the brandenburg gate. president trump is increasing military strength around the korean peninsula after missile tests by the north. well, this evening, we spoke with former ambassador chris hill who led the u.s. delegation in 2005 in talks with the north over curtailing its nuclear program. hill is the dean of the university of denver's josef korbel school. of international studies. in terms of american lives is north korea a threat or an irritant? >> it's a threat. it's a threat. first of all, we have some
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28,000, 30,000 americans in south korea, but we have to understand, this is an agreement we have. we are duty-bound, treaty-bound to come to south korea's defense. should the north koreans attack. if we have to go in there, we would be in the middle of the fight. so you bet. it's a threat to our lives. >> you led the american envoy negotiating a nuclear agreement with the current dictator's father. what do we need to know about the son? kim jong un? >> his father seemed to care what we thought. and what distinguishes his son, he doesn't seem to care what any of us think, and he's certainly not been interested in any, any phase of negotiation. >> is he sane? >> sane from the point of view of running that country, of making sure that he's consolidated power, making sure that everyone works for him, yeah, yeah. >> we know that the north koreans have been successful in building missiles and successful in detonating nuclear weapons in tests. the real trick is putting those two things together.
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wh t arehe chances that the north koreans are close? >> you know, very hard to say. but the feeling is that within the next four years, they could have a missile system with a nuclear warhead that would be credible. whether it would finally work when they pushed the button, hard to say, but it would be credible. and any president would have to consider that as a real threat. >> former ambassador chris hill. coming up, keep your eyes on the road and hands on the wheel. now, there's an app for that. later, as the water grows, drivers bailed.
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clearasil rapid action begins working fast for clearly visible results in as little as 12 hours. wow! but what other teen problems can it fix fast? will clearasil act fast to help this teen concentrate on his math test? darn! it only worked on the acne. can it hel... nope. no. so let's be clear: clearasil works fast on teen acne, not so much on other teen things. and now there's new clearasil overnight spot patches with patented technology for faster healing. smartphones, cars and teenagers, a dangerous combination. but now there's a smartphone app that could save lives. here's kris van cleave. >> would you say you're a good driver? >> as good as a 17-year-old could be, i guess.
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>> reporter: sarah gregory's been driving for about a year. her parents asked her to download an app that tracks and scores her performance every time she's behind the wheel. it's almost like having mom or dad in the car to remind you. >> knowing it's in the background, it helps me drive a lot better. if i'm speeding, i'll look down, and i'll be like, my app will take off for that. >> reporter: nearly 2,000 teens were killed in crashes in 2015. up 9% from the previous year. sarah's parents, cliff and julie, also use the ever drive app. >> we can tell when they use their phone or didn't use their phone. we can tell if they were exceeding the speed limit. >> reporter: can these devices make me as an adult a better driver. >> they have the potential to do that. but it's not going to work for everyone in the population. >> reporter: she runs the national safety council. >> what we have to do is get to a point where everyone is comfore
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driving behavior. >> reporter: the technology is a growing business from apps to devices like verizon hum. a driving performance tracker aimed at parents. >> if she drives like this, you can tell her to drive more like this. >> reporter: buick has now made smart driver technology standard in most vehicles. >> we have 1 million customers enrolled in smart driver today. >> reporter: the smart driver system not only helps driving but can save you money. >> you can opt in to seek an opportunity to get an insurance discount. and we're seeing that the customers are receiving a 30% discount on their insurance. >> reporter: the apps essentially try to make safe driving into a game and you get a score and are compared to other drivers. buick believes they can increase safety using this technology coupled with things like collision avoidance and lane departure avoidance. next, nascar's most popular driver nears his final lap.
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accidents. boom. love it. [struggles] show me the carfax. start your used car search at the all-new carfax.com. ♪ ♪ five-second rule protection. new lysol kitchen pro eliminates 99.9% of bacteria without any harsh chemical residue. ♪ lysol. what it takes to protect. parts of the carolinas were under water.
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raleigh got 8 inches of rain. more than 100 roads were closed. one driver had to abandon ship when her car was submerged. a cemetery flooded and at least one casket floated to the surface. in south carolina. nascar is losing its biggest star. dale earnhardt jr. says he will retire in november. the son of a legend, earnhardt won the most popular driver award 14 times and has 26 cup victories. now 42 and he recently married, he's faced many concussions. and he missed half of last season. up next, a lost version of cbs news. this portion is sponsored by ancestry dna. discover the s otoryyonly ur dna can tell
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finally tonight, we turn back the clock, 50 years to april 1967, and one of the more unusual chapters in television history. >> the cbs evening news, with arnold zenker, substituting for walter cronkite during the strike. >> yes, walter cronkite was on strike. the union representing tv personalities was on a walkout. some of the most famous tv faces of the day, including "what's my line" host john daley were off the set and on the street. newscasters were replaced by management. but who would sub for cronkite? an a to z search led to arnold zenker, a 28-year-old cbs
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through school doing radio broadcasts. >> i said i've never done television. they said you're going to do the cbs morning news, then they said stay around and do the midday news. >> and with about an hour of experience under his belt, he was called in to fill in for cronkite. >> planes have been using a massive bomb. >> he got more than 3,000 fan letters. >> it's the standard case of the understudy. the star goes out for whatever reason, and an understudy nobody's ever heard of sits in, sits in the chair, gets good reviews. and it's a terrific feel-good story. >> anchor was born. >> i do think they almost felt, he hit the lottery, maybe i could hit the lottery some day. >> on the 13th day, the strike was settled. after weeks at the pinnacle of network news, zenker was told he had a great future ahead of him.
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-- behind him. >> they laughed and said you're not a journalist. that's when i decided to go to boston and do the news. >> bitten by the anchor bug, he tried his hand at local tv, and years later he returned to cbs briefly in a "60 minutes" cameo, in his new career, training executives to master the public spotlight. >> he travels the country, preaching the gospel according to zenker. >> now a half century after zenker made headlines, he is a footnote. >> tv trivia for 100. >> arnold zenker replaced this trusted cbs newsman during a 13-day strike in 1967. >> this has been the cbs evening news with arnold zenker substituting for walter cronkite. that's the overnight news for this wednesday. for some of you the news continues, for others, check
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back later for cbs morning news and cbs this morning. from the broadcast ceninter new york city, i'm scott pelley. this is the "cbs overnight news." welcome to the overnight news. i'm don dahler. president trump has summoned all members of the senate today. for a briefing on north korea. tensions are rising in asia. washington and the united states as the north is expected to conduct another nuclear test. an armada is south of the korean peninsula. and trump is being asked to show restraint. adriana diaz has the story from beijing. >> reporter: in addition to beefing up america's military presence near north korea, president trump is also ramping up his war of words. monday he said kim jong un is not a strong militarily as he says and also blamed the international communitr
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>> the status quo in north korea's also unacceptable. >> reporter: at the white house on monday, president trump scolded members of the u.n. security council for falling short in their dealings with north korea. >> the council must be prepared to impose additional and stronger sanctions. >> reporter: in a show of force, intended to send a warning to north korea, the uss carl vinson strike group along with two japanese destroyers are rapidly approaching the korean peninsula. there they'll be joined by south korean ships. the uss michigan, a nuclear-powered submarine, also arrived in the port city of pusan today. angered by the buildup and threat of further sanctions, the regime has stepped up its rhetoric, unveiling new weapons while lashing out at its adversaries. north korean media called the movement extremely dangerous, saying the u.s. should consider carefully any catastrophic consequence.
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>> this raises the stakes. >> reporter: analyst jonathan polak says the white house needs to proceed cautiously. >> with the united states and others talking far too loose lay of the prospects of a preemptive strike, that's what would trigger retaliatory actions by north korea. >> reporter: it's also been three days since tony kim was detained at north korea's airport. kim joins two other americans being held by the regime. >> we could stumble needlessly into what would be the biggest crisis in east asia since the united states intervened in the korean war in 1950. >> reporter: to avoid that, president trump is working closely with china. he's already spoken with china's president twice in the past two weeks. first daughter and white house adviser, ivanka trump continues her visit to germany. she's taking part in an international woman's summit. but it wasn't all smiles and handshakes. ivanka actually got booed by the
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father as quote a tremendous champion of supporting families. mark phillips is in berlin. >> reporter: this is no ordinary visit by an ordinary white house official. this is three visits in one by ivanka trump the first daughter, the presidential adviser and the businesswoman. it's complicated, like the state of u.s./german relations right now. on the face of it, ivanka trump has come to berlin for a high-powered conference on promoting the role of working women. it's one of her pet issues. but she's also here because angela merkel knows an opportunity when she sees one. when the german chancellor went to washington to meet ivanka's father, the atmosphere bordered on icy. so when angela merkel met ivanka and invited her to the berlin's women conference it was more
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political analysts say it was a way to use a side door to get into the white house. >> you take what you get. >> reporter: and what do you think you get with her? >> you get access to donald trump and maybe a moderating effect to donald trump, because he's also surrounded by people who are less moderate and seem to be more radical. >> reporter: ivanka, the special adviser to the president, did tell gayle king that when it comes to trying to influence her father on issues that she cares about, she's not shy. >> this particular title was about giving critics the comfort that i'm holding myself to the highest ethical standard. but i'll weigh in with my father on, on the issues i feel strongly about. >> reporter: but this visit isn't about issues. it's about trying to jump start a stalled relationship. we actually don't know what ivanka trump's position is on
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washington and berlin right now. russia, nato refugees. we do know that the trump administration has yet to appoint its own ambassador to germany, so that right now go terms of high-level diplomacy, ivanka trump is it. a lot of your favorite tv shows could be in reruns this fall. the writers guild has voted to authorize a strike, and that could be bad news for hollywood. >> shows like the roseanne barr show, the gilligan's island show were shot right here in this studio. sound stages like this have never been busier. 455 of them were built just this season compared to, that's more tan about six years ago, more than double than about six years ago that is. right now, writers are saying we're seeing more content coming from hulu and netflix and they want hollywood to pay for the new reality. for now, it's all smiles on the late night talk shows.
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>> injected pieces of golf balls, let them play through. >> reporter: but all those jokes come from union writers who could soon be putting their pens down and putting the shows in jeopardy. the writers guild announced more than 6300 of this members voted by a margin of 96% to authorize a march on the picket lines if a deal isn't reached with the producers union before the current contract expires on may 1st. the fall lineup could also take a hate. >> it's not my fault i'm bad at sharing. i skipped kindergarten. >> reporter: this tv writer has worked on shows like "private practice." the writers are paid per episode. a traditional broadcast series
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runs2 22-24 episodes, but now shows on cable or basic streaming services run an average of just 12 episodes. the shows are often shot to look more like a movie, taking longer in production, which keeps writers tied up for the same amount of time while making less money. >> the average income for writers has gone down, 23%. it's about not being able to sustain yourself. >> reporter: writers are asking for higher script fees. bigger residuals from streaming media and larger contributions to their health plans. when unionized writers went on strike ten years ago, it lasted more than three months, halting production on dozens of tv shows and films. it also cost the industry at least $2 billion. in a statement released monday night, the producers alliance said they remain committed to reaching a deal but warned the 2007 writers strike hurt everyone. writers lost more than $287 million in compensation that was never recovered. >> hopefully it doesn't come to that. it will be hard, it will be scary if that's what we have to do.
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there's a place off the eastern shore of canada they call iceberg alley. each year, hundreds of large bergs float by, melting as they drift their way south. but this year, there's a bumper crop. and it's attracting a lot of tourists, scientists and jeff glor. >> reporter: we're off the eastern-most part of north america. the canadian coast guard alone has been called 85 times this season to help ships in trouble. but this is a team effort. and the goal is to make sure those emergencies never happen in the first place, which is why we went up with the international ice patrol to look for dangers below. the c-130j in hangar at the st. john's airport comes out only when conditions are right. in newfoundland and labrador,
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as we boarded, we saw how everyone every moment matters for the international ice patrol. >> all of this is to get a general overview. >> reporter: gabriele mcgraw is the u.s. coast guard commander leading the patrol. a coalition of 17 nations first formed in 1913 after the titanic's maiden voyage was doomed by an iceberg. >> any vessel heeding our warnings has been safe. >> reporter: this is about identifying and tracking the biggest and most dangerous formations. >> what it will do is track the sea temperature and the currents at the depth of 50 meters, which we consider to be the driving depth of the iceberg. >> reporter: signals from a buoy can be tracked immediately from the patrol's operating center in new
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660 icebergs right now. you typically see how many this time of year? >> on average, at the end of april, our number's about 212. >> reporter: so around three times as many right now. >> exactly. >> reporter: with more coming down. >> yes. >> reporter: this year's were brought in part by two extraordinary weather systems in march. >> a low pressure system that moved south of the island of newfoundland and it pulled those icebergs down south through the labrador current. so we had, in just a week's period, we went from 37 to 455 in the shipping lanes. >> reporter: it produced spectacular images. there it is from up high. but also loosened all this sea ice which has clogged the world's busiest shipping lane. >> this is something our ships have been dealing with for many
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>> reporter: ross is the head of standards for maersk. >> we really try to avoid the areas of icebergs. it is definitely something that needs to be considered in safe navigation. >> reporter: the waves of ice are crippling the fishing business and stranding large ferries. the patrol planes can fly just hundreds of feet above the ocean's surface to give spotters a clear view. there's also a 360 degree radar under the nose. what does the radar show? >> it will actually automatically pick up targets. >> reporter: the sights can be sublime. they draw tourists from around the world to this unique island province. but as commander mcgraw knows, the danger is ever present. the worst-case scenario you're trying to prevent is another >> exactly. that's something that we keep in our minds every day is the disaster that happened in 1912. and we strive to produce the best information possible.
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>> reporter: on just yesterday's flight, the international ice patrol found 382 icebergs. and keep in mind. peak season is not until may and june. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back. where's the rest of it? uh, the soy sauce? it's gone. treat your clothes better with new tide pods plus downy. it's got to be tide the following ad for your viewing convenience. i finally switched to geico. oh yeah? ended up saving a ton of money on car insurance. i hear they have a really great mobile app. the interface is remarkably intuitive. that's so important. ♪
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it says you apply the blue one ok, letto me. this. here? no. have a little fun together, or a lot. k-y yours and mine. two sensations that work together, so you can play together. there are some music producers who spend their entire
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for that perfect sound. then there are people who search the world for the perfect sound of silence. lee cowan found one of those. >> the trail is narrowing and will continue to narrow as we go up. >> reporter: it may sound a little odd, but gordon hempton may be the first person i've ever met who truly feeds his soul through the holes in his ears. >> i want you to listen to your feet of. >> reporter: just the sound of our footsteps? >> yeah. yeah. >> reporter: to him, nothing is more nourishing than pure, unpolluted. >> natural quiet. so coming out here in the quiet's almost like taking a vitamin
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>> vitamin q. you can't buy it, but you can have it. sound of nature is very definitely an endangered species. >> reporter: we first met gordon 27 years ago. >> we've also compromised on our ability to sense peace. >> reporter: when sunday morning followed him around as he went about recording silence. >> you get down low, and you can here the wo, wo, wo, wo. of the power of the surf being interpreted by this driftwood piece. >> reporter: he calls himself the sound tracker. he's been all over the world, listening to nature's soundscapes. and after all those years. >> all right, here it is, lee, the boardwalk. >> reporter: claims to have found one of the quietest spots in the lower 48 states. it's in the middle of the hoh rainforest in washington's olympic park. getting there is an adventure in being wet. the average rainfall here is anywhere between 12 and 14 feet. yes, feet.
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but a soggy remoteness is actually the point. gordon considers its silence so sacred, he won't allow anyone to utter a word. >> so we get a little further, i'm going to look at you. i'm going to give you the look, and that means no whispering even. >> reporter: okay. >> we're just going to go listen to the silence. >> reporter: he calls it one square inch of silence. a project he started on earth day, 12 years ago. it's his auditory line in the sand. a place he's trying to protect from all outside noise. you might think that'd be a pretty easy task way out here in the middle of nowhere. but -- >> there is no middle of nowhere if you take into account the sky. >> reporter: as we talked, just outside his one square inch of silence, we heard no fewer than five jets in less than an hour. >> listen what hapns
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jet passes. and grows louder and louder to the distant sound of the hoh which defines this valley against the mountain side. >> reporter: you just don't hear it anymore. >> it disappears. >> reporter: even the raindrops i can't hear anymore. >> yeah, you can't hear the raindrops. >> reporter: to gordon, it's only getting worse. >> i think it would be very difficult in the continental united states to find a place where you could go a day without hearing a noise or even an hour without hearing noise. >> reporter: the national park services natural sounds and night skies division. yes, there really is such a thing. over the last decade, its scientists have placed hundred of microphones all over the country. surveys show over 90% of the people who come to commune with nature come just as much for their ears as their eyes. >> it's critical for people, for
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for the quality of our health to provide these quiet places in the landscape where we can take refuge from the trials and stresses of every day life and immerse ourselves in the natural world that's a little bit kinder and gentler to us. >> reporter: just the noise we humans make, he says, is making it harder to find those places. and it's having real consequences for wildlife as well. >> you know, if you're the mouse trying to avoid being eaten, if your hearing is masked by noise, that means the predator can get that much closer to you before you're aware of it. >> reporter: you might be surprised at just how far a single piece of noise can travel. rangers at glacier national park for example were getting complaints from hikers that they could hear motorcycles, even though there were no roads for miles.
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>> reporter: so he was dispatched to see if that was possible. and according to acoustic modeling, it was. >> as it comes out of this pass down towards the lake. the noise will spread all the way across the lake and it might be 15 miles, maybe farther. >> reporter: again, that's one motorcycle. >> even if you don't perceive it as noise, they're still preventing you from hearing all the other sounds that we would like to preserve for you. >> so we try to record red-legged frogs. >> reporter: bernie krauss is trying to preserve nature sounds, too. in fact, he's got some 5,000 hours of recordings, all meticulously documented in his studio near napa valley. >> here's the specific chorus of frogs. >> that is really loud. >> reporter: couldn't hear ourselves talk. what he discovered by sheer volume is that in many of the places he set up his
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microphones, the voice of the natural world has changed. >> i've taken a look at my archive recently. and i think that over50% of what i've recorded no longer exists either it's all together silent or it no longer exists in any of its original form. >> reporter: he points to this recording he made in a costa rican rainforest back in 1989. he went back to that same spot ten years later, after much of the nearby area ha been logged. and this time, it sounded like this. >> it's dramatic. >> reporter: this great animal orchestra, as he calls it, has a lot to say. the early morning chorus of song birds at california's sugar loaf ridge state park is one of his favorites.
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>> what these critters are doing is telling us how they're feeling about this particular time and place. and it's a narrative. it's a story. >> reporter: a story bernie says is being composed by nature every day. we just need stop and listen. it used to the environmental protection agency did that. but in the '80s, the office of noise abatement is closed, and with it most of the federal government's ears, save the national park service, which leaves the listening largely to folks like bernie, and of course gordon. when we left him at his one square inch of silence, he was diligently taking notes and every once in a while smiling at the tiniest of sounds and wincing at the ones he wishes weren't there at all. >> we save what we love at any cost. so when we fall back in love
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the environmental crisis will be
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ople take action against housing discrimination? my friends were told they might be more comfortable in another neighborhood. my co-worker was pressured by her landlord to pay her rent with sexual favors. my neighbor was told she needs to get rid of her dog, even though he's an assistance animal. they all reported these forms of housing discrimination. when you don't report them, landlords and owners are allowed to keep breaking the law. housing discrimination is illegal. if you think you've been a victim, report it. like we did. narrator: if you suspect that you've been discriminated against because of race, color, religion, national origin, sex, familial status or disability, report it to hud or your local fair housing center. visit hud.gov/fairhousing or call the hud hotline at 1-800-669-9777. fair housing is your right. use it.
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center inte captioning funded by cbs it's wednesday, april 26th, 2017. this is the "cbs morning news." trying to lock down a legislative victory, president trump rolls out his tax overhaul today. a look at who could see the biggest break and why it's anything but a done deal. this morning the white house is lashing out at another federal judge after the president's order punishing sanctuary cities is put on hold. and booed in berlin. audience members let ivanka trump have it after she praised her father.

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